Saturday, March 28, 2015

Coin Silver

A few weeks ago a woman called me and wanted me to look at something that her and her husband had found while metal detecting at her old family farm. She told me that the last people to live on the site, which is now a field, was her great grand parents. She had three pieces of silverware, a spoon and a baby spoon along with what I call a butter knife, which is really a desert or tea knife. Someone told her husband they were plated and not worth much, so she wanted me to acid test it. I told her we did not have to test it because it was clearly marked. It was coin silver marked by A. Cooper Pure Coin. Archibald Cooper was a silversmith in Louisville KY in the 1840's and 50's. She did not know about coin silver and a lot of people have not ever heard of it. It is getting to be more and more rare as it is highly collectable. It can be very valuable depending on the maker and design.

Coin silver was made by colonial silversmiths and produced in the United States until sometime after the Civil War. It was made mostly with European coins like the Spanish reales. Sterling silver was expensive and thinner than coin silver. Silversmiths made a variety of flatware, platters, pitches and even mint julep cups.

The lady called me yesterday and was delighted her three pieces are valued at about $300.00 but added she would not take anything for them, being they are family keepsakes.

Look in those old junk boxes for those old burned looking spoons, you never know.

May all your trails be smooth and your treasure sites many.
Best Wishes and Good Hunting


 

n colonial America, silversmiths decided to forge their own silverware and goods to avoid patronizing British purveyors of sterling silver. They collected useless European coins, mainly Spanish reales and melted them down. Because coins were an alloy of metals, their silver content was lower than that of sterling, only 90 percent. America did not adopt the Sterling standard until 1870. Coin silver was made in the United States from the earliest colonial times until just after the Civil War. There were some coin silver manufacturers who continued to produce after the Civil War, but most silversmiths changed to the use of the much more popular sterling silver.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/facts_5005906_what-coin-silver-flatware.html
n colonial America, silversmiths decided to forge their own silverware and goods to avoid patronizing British purveyors of sterling silver. They collected useless European coins, mainly Spanish reales and melted them down. Because coins were an alloy of metals, their silver content was lower than that of sterling, only 90 percent. America did not adopt the Sterling standard until 1870. Coin silver was made in the United States from the earliest colonial times until just after the Civil War. There were some coin silver manufacturers who continued to produce after the Civil War, but most silversmiths changed to the use of the much more popular sterling silver.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/facts_5005906_what-coin-silver-flatware.html
n colonial America, silversmiths decided to forge their own silverware and goods to avoid patronizing British purveyors of sterling silver. They collected useless European coins, mainly Spanish reales and melted them down. Because coins were an alloy of metals, their silver content was lower than that of sterling, only 90 percent. America did not adopt the Sterling standard until 1870. Coin silver was made in the United States from the earliest colonial times until just after the Civil War. There were some coin silver manufacturers who continued to produce after the Civil War, but most silversmiths changed to the use of the much more popular sterling silver.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/facts_5005906_what-coin-silver-flatware.html